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Archive for July, 2007

Northern California College of Construction Opens Doors

Posted by Taylor Morris on July 31, 2007

During World War II, Rough and Ready Island was a naval base and the central communications point for all of the armed services. As of 2004, the Port of Stockton took over most of the area and designated it as a redevelopment area. Today, Rough and Ready is also a commercial port that ships raw materials throughout the world. As of two weeks ago, the island is adding something new to its history.

NCCC First Class Start

On July 16, 2007, The Northern California College of Construction (NCCC) opened its doors in Stockton, CA…on Rough and Ready Island.

The NCCC was started to fill the needs and demands of qualified and certified heavy equipment operators not only in northern California, but everywhere in the country. Jeff Dorricott, the president and director of the college, said that “Our focus here at Northern California College of Construction is to equip our students with a solid foundation to become successful as Heavy Equipment and Crane operators. We have built an educational environment specifically aimed at providing technology with hands-on learning practices. We are here because we are passionate about what we do and that is what will set our students down the path of success.”

The opening ceremonies were a success at Rough and Ready Island. The NCCC had 17 students begin training on the opening day-a 100% show-rate. Dorricott sees this as evidence for the demand of heavy equipment operators in the area.

The NCCC is one of five member schools of The National Association of Heavy Equipment Training Schools (www.nahets.com). Individually and collectively, these schools serve a significant demographic that is essential to the heavy equipment and construction industries, as well as society at-large.

President of NAHETS, Matt Klabacka, believes that this demographic includes “Post-secondary students [that] can be defined in five separate categories: the traditional college-bound student, the semi-traditional college-bound student, the non-traditional college-bound student, the non college-bound student, and the high school dropout.” Klabacka feels that the current educational community is not meeting the needs of these people. He further stated that “the training of welders, truck drivers, crane operators, and equipment operators have been lacking in recent years, leading to a shortage of well-trained professionals.”

The Northern California College of Construction aims to serve the needs of these students by supplying industries with a qualified, motivated, and skilled entry-level equipment operator. The means to accomplish these goals hinge on curriculum and standards. At the NCCC, as well as all NAHETS member schools, several learning methods combine to create a most effective education in heavy equipment operating: classroom instruction, simulation training, hands-on operating, internet tools, and more. In addition, each member school or college must meet the following credentials:

*Full time campus director or college president
* Full time on site campus job placement director
* Full time on site campus financial aid director
* Full time on site campus admissions director
* Full time on site Heavy equipment training director
* Full time Certified heavy equipment training instructors
* 20 acre minimum heavy equipment training area
* 3-4 classrooms dedicated to training heavy equipment operators
* No other business conducted at training site
* Clean administrative facilities.

With the addition of the Northern California College of Construction to the heavy equipment industry, dreams and goals will be realized for those who aspire to become accomplished heavy equipment operators; and the nation-wide demand of construction companies to employ these operators will further be satisfied.

 

Posted in *Press/Media, Admissions & Recruitment, Education & Training, heavy equipment, heavy equipment operator, heavy equipment schools, heavy equipment training, Home, industry news | 2 Comments »

NAHETS Internet Manager’s “Blast!” Off To Tokyo

Posted by Taylor Morris on July 26, 2007

Three…two…one “Blast!” off!

 

The Internet Manager for the National Association of Heavy Equipment Training Schools, Mike Wille, flew in to Tokyo, Japan on July 21, 2007. However, he is not there to develop websites or work on flash programming; he is there to play the trombone and percussion.Mike Wille in Tokyo.

Since its opening in London of 1999, Mike is currently on his third tour with the Tony-Award Winning show, Blast!

There is no other show like Blast!. Nor are there any other performers like those who perform in the show. Blast! has its beginning roots in the Star of Indiana, the world famous and world champion drum corps. Blast! is a compilation of various musical, athletic, and theatrical styles molded into one ultimate show. It takes instrumental music and outdoor pageantry into a theatrical setting. Blast! portrays dancing, choreography, marching, drumming, acting, and instrument playing all into one performance. There are various props, colors, stage settings, and costumes that are used as well. The performers are the epitome of athletes and musicians, who are specifically trained masters of this new genre of stage performance. Wille said Blast! is like watching a ballet or play, where the dancers and performers are not just dancing and acting, but also playing the musical instruments simultaneously.Picture of Blast! Show

Mike received a scholarship for trombone performance in college, but decided that his best career interest would be a degree in computers, not music. So he graduated from Colorado State University with a bachelor’s degree in Business Computer Information Systems in 2003. After graduating, he specialized in flash development and website development. He started working for NAHETS in January of 2007.

Despite his expertise and skill in internet management, Mike said couldn’t resist the opportunity to go to Japan for the second time and begin his third tour with Blast! He says that deep down he feels like a musician. Mike is the bass trombone player and percussionist for the show.

In between performances Mike will continue to be involved with NAHETS’ web development.

Posted in Amazing Stories, industry news | Leave a Comment »

African American Construction Heritage

Posted by Taylor Morris on July 26, 2007

Black History encompasses many recognizable people, events, and accomplishments. Martin Luther King…Michael Jordan…Rosa Parks…the list goes on; however, there is a significant heritage to black history that takes a back seat to many of these popular and more-exposed subjects. That heritage is construction.

Harry C. Alford, co-founder and CEO of the National Black Chamber of Commerce, and NNPA columnist, believes that “one of the richest legacies of African descendants is construction.” The tie to construction extends back to pyramid building in ancient Egypt. Even slavery dealt with construction, as many of the slaves brought over helped build major cities and territories in the eastern and southern parts of the country.

Certain African Americans rose to the top of their trades. One example is Frank Williams, who built spiral staircases so well that the wealthy would fly him to Australia, Japan, and other countries to construct spiral staircases in their mansions. Others were considered masters of drywall, masonry, and other construction specialties.

As the skills and professions of African-Americans in the construction industry progressed however, opposition also increased. Often times, African-American workers performed exceptionally for a lower price than their competitors, mainly white workers at the time. As a result, unions formed and made competition difficult. These unions triggered the Davis-Bacon Act, which prevented discrimination in rate of pay, implementing uniform pay for all workers. As a result, the price competition stagnated, and African Americans could no longer work for a cheaper price. It wasn’t long before white workers became dominant in the field, despite the skill and talent of the African American workers.

Despite these events, today there are a few African-American construction companies that have withstood the storms. The founders of these companies emphasized education to their children, and today the generations are reaping those benefits. Once again, African-Americans are excelling in construction, and not just in craftsmanship, but in construction management, architecture, urban development, and other areas of emphasis.

In relation to this topic, NAHETS is especially devoted to carry on this tradition, not only among African Americans, but among any and all ethnic groups interested in becoming heavy equipment operators. All are crucial members of the construction industry, and NAHETS provides opportunities for all to fulfill their aspirations of becoming heavy equipment operators.

http://www.finalcall.com/artman/publish/article_3593.shtml

Posted in Education & Training, heavy equipment, heavy equipment operator, heavy equipment schools, heavy equipment training, Home, industry news, Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

Ingersoll Rand Stores Now Operating Under Volvo CE Name

Posted by nahetsblog on July 25, 2007

July 23, 2007
Winston Leonard (source Volvo CE press release)
The acquisition of the road machinery division of Ingersoll Rand in April 2007 by Volvo Construction Equipment (Volvo CE) included twenty Ingersoll Rand company stores,which provide sales, service, parts and rental to construction equipment customers in local markets. The company stores’ organization, formerly Ingersoll Rand Equipment & Services, began operating as Volvo Construction Equipment & Services (VCES) on July 1, 2007.

The majority of sales through these VCES stores will continue to be road machinery, forklifts, and Ingersoll Rand utility products. Some of the stores will be considered for the Volvo compact equipment products.

The VCES branches, under the management of Volvo CE North America, are located in eleven states. Operations administration for all locations is managed in Annandale, New Jersey.

Posted in heavy equipment, industry news | Leave a Comment »

Monster Machine Picks up Bulldozer

Posted by Taylor Morris on July 19, 2007

What do you think of when you hear the words “heavy equipment” mentioned? What images enter your mind when you come across the words “heavy machinery?” Or perhaps you have never thought much about those things. Typically, large pieces of equipment such as cranes, bulldozers, excavators, backhoes, loaders, and others are associated with those terms. And although these are considered “heavy equipment” and “heavy machines”, one could wonder if larger machines exist. They do. If you think cranes and bulldozers are big, take a look at the biggest moving man-made machines.

First is the giant bucket wheel excavator , a.k.a. ” the bagger 288.” It was built by Krupp in Germany of 1978. Biggest man-made moving machine

Bagger 288

This machine is 984 feet long, the equivalent of about six Olympic-sized swimming pools in length. It weighs about 91 million pounds, the size of about 380 Blue Whales, which is the largest animal on the planet. It moves on treads to different open-air mine sites. In 2001, last time it went on one of these expeditions, it traveled 22 kilometers in a straight line.

Driver Seat of Bagger 288 Bagger 288 on the move

The bagger eating a bulldozer

The bagger eating a bulldozer

The bagger eating a bulldozer

Although the average person would consider a bulldozer a large machine, for the bagger 288 it was nothing but a snack. And don’t think that the bagger is the only one of its kind. At Krupp’s site (http://www.tk-mining.com/hme.html) you can see more, such as these:

Despite how huge and impressive the bagger 288 is, it just would not be fair unless it had a competitor in size. In Lichterfeld, Germany there appears to be another “biggest” moving man-made machine. This colossus of a machine is called the Overburden Conveyor Bridge F60.

The Overburden Conveyor Bridge F60

Although it weighs less than the bagger 288 (only 11,000 tons instead of 45,500), its length is untouchable-502 meters, or 1,647 feet, (compare 300 meters, or 948 feet for the bagger.) It is also 202 meters, or 663 feet wide. It was built in 1991 by VEB TAKRAF Lauchhammer. After only 13 months in operation, it was shut down for “energy-political” reasons.

To get an idea of how long this machine is in relative terms, if the Empire State Building fell over its length would fall about 200 feet shorter than that of the F60. If the Sears Tower fell over it would be less than 100 feet longer than the F60. Note this comparison includes the lightning rods and antennas of the Empire State Building and the Sears Tower, which if it did not, the F60 would be longer in length than the height of both buildings. Also note that the Sears tower is said to be the tallest building in the world measured from ground to pinnacle point. Below is a picture comparison between the F60 and the Eiffel Tower.

Comparison between the F60 and Eiffel Tower

The Overburden Conveyor Bridge F60

 

The Overburden Conveyor Bridge F60

 

 

 

After seeing how enormous these machines are, we have not seen exactly what they can do. A last look at the heaviest of heavy machinery will give us a glimpse of what these massive human-built machines are capable of.

Before the last two machines were built, in 1969 “The Big Muskie” owned the show and was considered the largest moving man-made piece of machinery. The Big Muskie could move 39 million pounds of earth every hour. It could uncover coals seams up to 150 feet into the earth’s crust. It could “swing its boom” 600 feet across the landscape. It remained in full-production until 1991, when it was shut down. It was later scrapped and only its enormous metal bucket still remains as a roadside attraction in Reinersville, Ohio.

The Big Muskie The Big Muskie

An even more impressive illustration of what these man-made machines can do is depicted in looking at the largest man-made holes in the world. The diamond mine in Siberia is 525 meters (1,722 feet) deep, and is 1.25 kilometers in diameter, 0r about 8/10 of a mile.

Diamond Mine in Siberia. One of the largest man-made holes in the world. Diamond Mine in Siberia. One of the largest man-made holes in the world.

Diamond Mine in Siberia. One of the largest man-made holes in the world.

The red arrow in the picture directly above is pointing to a huge mining truck. It takes the truck over two hours to get from the bottom of the mine to the top.

Although the uses of these pieces of heavy equipment are not as common as the backhoe you see on the side of the road, or the crane next to your work building, they are nonetheless intriguing spectacles for the human eye and mind-with a significant purpose. What makes them even more impressive is the fact that they are built and operated by humans. Without the training of heavy equipment operators, the construction of these machines is useless. And whether it is a backhoe, crane, or the Big Muskie being operated, the credentials to operate must be the same: professional training and education, in-class and on-site instruction, certification and licensing, safety, and standards. This is the NAHETS (www.nahets.com) vision; and although you will not find the bagger 288 at NAHETS training schools, you will find the above credentials. This is our mission-to provide society with the “heaviest” of the heavy equipment operators.

Sources:

http://www.darkroastedblend.com/2006/11/biggest-and-hungriest-machines.html

http://www.darkroastedblend.com/2006/11/even-bigger-machines-dig-bigger-holes.html

http://www.swapmeetdave.com/Humor/Workshop/Trencher.htm

http://www.f60.de/index_e.htm

http://www.hfinster.de/StahlArt2/archive-Lausitz-BW-72-5-22.11.2000-en.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Amazing Stories, heavy equipment, heavy equipment photos, heavy equipment schools | Leave a Comment »

Oklahoma College of Construction Receives Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation Award

Posted by Taylor Morris on July 17, 2007

From June 2-4, 2007 the Oklahoma College of Construction (OCC) attended the Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation Conference, where it was recognized and awarded for its service to the clients of the Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation Centers.

Approximately 72 service providers attended the conference. Suzanne Constien, the Agency Services Director, represented the OCC and accepted the award. The award given to the OCC was for Outstanding Work with the State of Missouri for people with disabilities. There were only three of these Certificates of Recognition awarded, and the OCC was the only out-of-state provider that received one of these awards. The award was presented by Yvonne Wright, President of the association for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors. She said that the OCC surpassed expectation in making clients and counselors feel comfortable about affiliating with an out-of-state school.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

The Oklahoma College of Construction and the Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation offices have been working together for over four months. During this time, there have been approximately 11 students from the MVR agency that have attended and trained at the OCC.

In addition to Missouri, Constien is also working with agencies in Oklahoma, Texas, and Kansas. In order for these agency students to train at the OCC, they must qualify through their state agency, as well as the OCC being approved through the agency and on State Training Providers List. The OCC is building a strong reputation in providing heavy equipment training to out-of-state agency students, and has had about 55 such students year-to-date.Suzanne Constien

The Oklahoma College of Construction has been in operation since 2005. It is a campus branch of the National Association of Heavy Equipment Training Schools. The OCC is dedicated to providing training, education, and national certifications for students to become heavy equipment operators. After students complete any or all of the various training programs, then the College dedicates its efforts to providing job placement assistance for the graduates.

Posted in *Press/Media, awards, Education & Training, Graduate Placement, heavy equipment, heavy equipment schools, heavy equipment training, Home, industry news | Leave a Comment »

Southern California College of Construction Opens Doors

Posted by nahetsblog on July 3, 2007

The Southern California College of Construction opened its doors on June 16, 2007. California College of Construction Grand Opening Ribbon Cutting

Historically, the male, non-traditional, college-bound student population has been under served. For women, non-traditional higher education is generally served through cosmetology schools, medical assistant schools, and career colleges. However, the male-dominated trades have been overlooked by the majority of the higher education community. Community colleges do serve a portion of the male population, but not to the level necessitated by educational demands.

In past years, students were given the opportunity to learn a trade by going to vocational schools. Unfortunately, these “trade schools” have diminished, and electronics schools are becoming obsolete. Electronics are no longer repaired-they are replaced. The training of welders, truck drivers, crane operators, and equipment operators have been lacking in recent years, leading to a shortage of well-trained professionals.

The educational community is not meeting the needs of several facets of the male population: the non-traditional, college-bound high school graduate, the high school graduate who is not college-bound, and the high school drop out. This large population is severely under-served by the traditional college educational products.

Matt Klabacka, president of NAHETS, believes that the market is ripe for a product that provides an alternative to the current educational options, at the same time meeting the need for nationally certified heavy equipment operators.

Klabacka states: “Post-secondary students can be defined in five separate categories: the traditional college-bound student, the semi-traditional college-bound student, the non-traditional college-bound student, the non college-bound student, and the high school dropout. “

Southern California College of Construction aims to serve the needs of these students by supplying industries with a qualified, motivated, and skilled entry-level equipment operator.

The National Association of Heavy Equipment Training Schools, NAHETS (www.nahets.com) was formed to improve upon and fill the needs of the equipment operator shortage around the country. A short review of Wikipedia shows that NAHETS is the nationally recognized organization to oversee quality and standards within the heavy equipment industry. NAHETS campuses utilize standardized curriculum produced by the National Center for Construction Education, and institutional standards.

California College of Construction Grand Opening Staff Members

Members schools and colleges of NAHETS must have the following:

* Full time campus director or college president
* Full time on site campus job placement director
* Full time on site campus financial aid director
* Full time on site campus admissions director
* Full time on site Heavy equipment training director
* Full time Certified heavy equipment training instructors
* 20 acre minimum heavy equipment training area
* 3-4 classrooms dedicated to training heavy equipment operators
* No other business conducted at training site
* Clean administrative facilities.

A heavy equipment training school that wishes to join NAHETS must have no other activity associated with the operation of the school. In other words, 100% of their operations must be dedicated to training heavy equipment operators.

Posted in *Press/Media, Admissions & Recruitment, Education & Training, heavy equipment, heavy equipment operator, heavy equipment schools, heavy equipment training, Home, industry news | Leave a Comment »

 
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